Have a Safe and Happy Easter!

Happy Easter to everyone from Kittens Whiskers! The Easter Bunny will be coming around today with lots of Easter eggs and Easter candy for the kiddos, but there are a few things you should know about their safety when it comes to your other kiddos – your cats.  Here are a few tips for making sure your furr babies have a safe and happy Easter.

Easter Cats

Easter Eggs

Cooked eggs are a great source of protein for cats, and it’s ok to let them eat them, as long as they haven’t been left out of the fridge for over 2 hours. But don’t let your cat eat raw eggs, as they can cause food poisoning from bacteria like salmonella or E. coli. Also, there is a protein in raw egg whites, called avidin, that interferes with the absorption of biotin, a B vitamin. This can cause skin problems and problems with your cat’s coat. Another thing to watch out for is licking of the outside of decorated eggs. The dyes used to color the eggs could be harmful to kitty, as well.

Chocolate

Chocolate Easter eggs – yum! But as with dogs, chocolate is a no-no for cats. There is a compound in chocolate called theobromine, and there is also caffeine, both of which can be toxic to cats, depending on the type of chocolate and the amount consumed. Caffeine can actually be fatal for cats, if it’s a large enough quantity, and there is no antidote. Signs to watch out for are restlessness, rapid breathing, heart palpitations, muscle tremors, and fits. Dark chocolate and baking chocolate have the highest concentrations of theobromine and white chocolate has the least, but it’s best to avoid both. Signs to watch out for are vomiting, diarrhea and trembling. If your cat is exhibiting these signs, call your vet immediately!

Easter Grass

Cats love things that are shiny and move, and Easter grass is no exception. If your cat swallows some of the grass, it can get tangled up in their intestines and cause a bowel obstruction, which may require emergency surgery. If you see your cat with Easter grass in their mouth, do not try to pull it out of their throat or you may cause more damage if it’s already tangled up inside them. Call the emergency vet clinic instead.

Easter Lillies and Daddodils

Both are popular Easter flowers, and both are toxic to cats. It’s best if you can just not have them around, but if you do, watch your cats like a hawk around them! The first signs you’ll see are vomiting and lethargy, and if left untreated, could lead to kidney (renal) failure and possibly death.

Now that you know what to watch out for so that your kitties will be safe, take care and have a Happy Easter!

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